Interim Blog Title

Big eyes to see a lot, big mouth to spill a lot

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Adam Miller interview

Audio interview with Adam Miller. Recorded over iPhone speaker phone into Garage Band, accidentally compressed the file so it could be exported. Scrapped idea and just played Garage Band file while Audacity recorded it.

All of this means that the sound quality, while intelligible, is god awful.

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A look at Poynter’s blogger Jim Romenesko

Non-profit j-school Poynter Institute for Media Studies’ site poynter.org has a media darling by the name of Jim Romenesko, the blogger-in-chief, so to speak, who manages Poynter’s most coveted blog Romenesko+

A journalist’s journalist, Romenesko blogs on all things related to news. In a NYTimes.com blogpost on Romenesko’s recently announced "semi-retirement" from Poynter in Media Decoder, Jeremy Peters describes Romenesko as “the media blogger who predated the blogosphere and became a must-read source of news about the news.” 

Peters article also quoted a Poynter colleague of Romenesko’s: 

“Along the way, Romenesko has sustained the most reliable – and readable — daily chronicle of one of journalism’s most important eras,” wrote Bill Mitchell, a Poynter faculty member. “Jim’s blog brought transparency to newsrooms, equipping readers and staffers alike to hold those organizations accountable in the way that they scrutinize the operations of others.”

Romenesko looks to retire at the year’s end to drive his followers to a self-titled website JimRomenesko.com, which is set to launch in 2012. The site will likely continue Romenesko’s reporting on his watch over happenings in the media. Meanwhile, Poynter will survive - keeping Romenesko as a part-time employee. 

Naturally, Poynter’s Julie Moos reports the media pioneer will keep tweeting as he prepares for semi-retirement: 

Twitter has become an increasingly important tool for Jim and for Poynter. Between his approximately 33,000 followers and Poynter’s approximately 33,000 followers, there are about 58,000 unduplicated users receiving our updates on Twitter. So Jim will continue to tweet frequently about media and tech from the @romenesko account and from the @poynter account. Those tweets often offer information we don’t publish on the website, as well as links to news we publish. And we will continue to tweet all Poynter news and How To’s from @poynter.

Romenesko posts around seven media-related blog entries daily to the blog that holds his namesake. If you missed it up there, you can go to it here

Many of his posts use a voice that asserts authority over information, even as Romenesko purposefully keeps his posts short. He lets his solid reporting do the talking - and he highlights the real good stuff by linking back frequently and often pulling out illustrative and sourced quotations. 

He does original reporting as seen here, here and here. The second “here” is a post on why newspapers use different figures for the total fatalities of 9/11. Timely, interesting and well-reported - though still way shorter than this blog post. The man wastes little time, makes phone calls and asks people for information - no wonder he’s a real journalist’s journalist. 

Nearly all of Romenseko’s blogs consist of a collection of aggregated links. He gives his opinions seldomly and does so demurely; he relies more heavily on letting the media members he’s reporting speak the issues. Again, there are lots of pop-out quotes.

He also uses charts to illustrate his points at times, though with less frequency than his link backs.  

When highlighting particular individuals, Romenesko often includes a tiny headshot of the person being discussed. For media sites or businesses, his posts displays their logo in miniature form. 

So in true Romenesko fashion, here is his face courtesy mediabistro.com: Courtesy mediabistro.com 

According to Moos’ article, “just last week, a survey of business journalists found Poynter.org and Romenesko a top source of media industry news.”

So for the latest news on journalism’s shuffling, shoving and shining, follow Romenesko+ or Jim Romenesko on Twitter. 

Filed under Jim Romenesko Romenesko+

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I would like to boil water at the table. I don’t need to, of course. But I feel it would make breakfast more exciting. 

miss-mi:

Faraday Tea set by Free Time Industries.
Faraday is a concept project, a borosilicate glass and maple tea service with an induction plate in the tray.
“The use of induction technology allows the boiling of water to take  place at the table, without a stovetop or a steel kettle. Neither the  serving try nor the objects upon it get hot while the water boils within  the glass vessel.”

I would like to boil water at the table. I don’t need to, of course. But I feel it would make breakfast more exciting. 

miss-mi:

Faraday Tea set by Free Time Industries.

Faraday is a concept project, a borosilicate glass and maple tea service with an induction plate in the tray.

“The use of induction technology allows the boiling of water to take place at the table, without a stovetop or a steel kettle. Neither the serving try nor the objects upon it get hot while the water boils within the glass vessel.”

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Cool stuff.

ckck:

WVIL (Wireless Viewfinder Interchangeable Lens) camera concept, which may or may not be what cameras will be like in a not too distant future. The idea of being able to use the lens mounted to the camera/viewfinder or unmounted but wirelessly connected is particularly intriguing, although I’m not sure how realistic since it’d require batteries in the lens.

More info and photos on their website.

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Emily Felder, mullets and the snow

Dwarfs me by six inches, alters her hair color about every couple weeks (or days depending on the last dye), befriends all types, convinced me to manage a tumblr, and stands with me in the fight against mullets, while still appreciating their true concept.

Mullet's concept: business in the front, party in the backConcept may be “business in the front, party in the back,” but examine “Mullet Man” on this post’s right side.

One look and you see why we’re 99.9 percent against the mullet (and the “(un)happy trail”).

So what do we talk about now? What does anyone talk about when they’ve run out of things to say: the weather!

Western Mass. is currently seeing a snowman revolution, and the evil snow people are calling in all the troops for backup. All snow “figures” from flakes to sleet once on stoploss are now on active duty. And while the commotion has slowed, we’re waiting for more rockets of white stuff to hit homebase later tonight.

(Seriously though,) news sites are reporting “The second storm will strike Wednesday morning bringing 4 to 6 inches of snow with as much as an inch of ice to Hampden County and 6 to 12 inches of snow in Franklin and Berkshire Counties. Hampshire, Franklin and Berkshire counties will likely get 6 to 12 inches of snow Wednesday,” said meterologist for ABC40/Fox 6 Mike Masco, according to Stan Freeman of Masslive.com’s article.

And if Massholes think they’ve got it bad, just look at Time’s latest article on the state of Chicago and the snowpocalypse!

Let’s hope the majority of Americans make it through the wrath of winter alive. And I say majority because of this poor soul, this other poor soul, and this one too.